Photograms


“The shadows that things make.
The things that shadows make.”

~ Les Rudnick


Photograms are a type of photography. While not well-known, they are the oldest form of photography, and they are very distinct in mechanism. I love photograms, the creative process of making a photogram and how it is different from the conventional photograph created with a camera.

Photograms represent some of the earliest and some of the newest photographic images. The first photograms produced were by William Henry Fox Talbot, and he referred to these as “photogenic drawings”. Thomas Wedgwood called these images sunprints. Alvin Langdon Coburn used the term Vortograph for his images, Christian Schad refered to his images as Schadographs, and Man Ray called his images Rayographs. Laszlo Moholy-Nagy called them photograms, which is the term most often used today.

The photogram is a type of photograph that is made without the use of a camera were objects are placed on a photosensitive substrate and exposed to light. The image produced is a negative image, which looks like a shadow or X-ray. I like to think of photograms as the shadows that are created by the dance of light and objects. Creating a photogram is art, science, and alchemy, and a photogram is a magical blend of these features. Unable to reproduce the exact same light and chemistry, the process of capturing an image is a unique moment in time.

Like all artists, I learn from those that came before me. Below is a small homage to some of the photogram artists that have influenced me the most.


William Henry Fox Talbot 1839

William Henry Fox Talbot 1839


Thomas Wedgwood c1800

Thomas Wedgwood c1800


Alvin Langdon Coburn 1917

Alvin Langdon Coburn 1917


Christian Schad 1918

Christian Schad 1918


Man Ray 1922

Man Ray 1922


László Moholy-Nagy 1926

László Moholy-Nagy 1926


Pablo Picasso 1962

Pablo Picasso 1962


Adam Fuss
1961 – present


Select photograms of mine:

See more of my photograms here.


To acquire artwork by Natasha Bacca
contact me at 541-788-7212 or Natasha@NatashaBacca.com.


Thank you for viewing!  

If you have questions or comments I would love to hear them.

Much love to you all!

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